Looking For A Creative Conversion? We’ve Got You Covered

Creativity-Chispa MagazineIt doesn’t matter how certain you were of your professional choices at the beginning of your career. As a rule of the thumb, most people switch career on average five times during their professional life. Consequently, finding yourself in a position where you might want to walk away from your current career to try something new is actually nothing unnatural or abnormal. Many people have gone through a professional conversion. Many have been successful, especially when they’ve chosen to bring their most valuable qualities into a new sector. It’s not to say that it’s going to be easy. Of course, it’s going to be challenging and stressful at times, but it’s fair to say that diving into a completely new universe is always a bit of a shock at first. If you find your everyday dull and you can’t motivate yourself to go to the office in the morning, then it’s fair to say that it’s time for you to investigate new directions. Generally speaking, most individuals who get bored in their career complaint about the lack of creativity in their day-to-day job. If this is also a problem you’ve been dealing with, there are many ways to make the most of your unused creative skills in a new career. Creative people, ultimately, have a different perspective of the world, and from creative thinking to deep emotional awareness. Here are a few ideas for you to become a creative player in a new industry.

What do you have to offer? When you change career, the first thing you need to do is to consider your resume. Up until your most recent position, your CV was probably designed to attract employers who needed someone for the role you’re in at the moment. Your most relevant skills are tailored to your current career. Undeniably, a change of career requires from you the creation of a new CV that can highlight your experience and your creativity. However, as you change your resume, you also need to remember that creative industry sectors also have a need for traditional skills, such as financial expertise, technical knowledge and communication skills. Ultimately, being creative is not enough to get you a job. It’s your specific set of skills that makes you valuable for a new employer. For instance, a lot of creative roles in marketing agency focus on digital creativity, but lack financial knowledge, which could be valuable in client management positions. Additionally, if you’re looking to employ your creativity to support charity institutions, you’ll find that soft skills in communication and organization can help to put your CV on top of the list. In other words, you need to be aware that you can compensate your lack of professional creative experience with essential skills that are missing in creative sectors. Besides, your hobbies and the way you approach projects can also be used to present your creative side to future employers. Just because it doesn’t say you’re creative on your business card, it doesn’t you can’t be! So, it’s essential that you evaluate your options and collect information from professional creative blogs and magazines. You’ll be surprised to find out that some of the most productive professionals came from a different career. Think of Toni Morrison, for instance, who published her first novel aged 40. George Saunders was an environmental engineer before he became a best-selling author. Even Sting started as a teacher. So, don’t feel embarrassed by your previous experience outside of the creative sphere.  

The building industry needs creative people. Creative people are in the strangest places. If you thought that being creative meant becoming an artist, you were seriously misguided. Creativity exists in most professions, and you can make the most of your quick thinking or your DIY hobbies in most sectors. Think of the building sector, for instance. Building sites are never as straightforward as they might appear on paper. In fact, the building sector is probably one of the most high-stress environment. To put it simply, everything that could go wrong sometimes does, and when it happens, builders have a hard time of fixing issues and keeping up with the schedule. That’s precisely why professional companies such as DSC Personnel are always looking for new talent to join their team and bring a new way of thinking about problems and obstacles. As odd as it might sound, creativity is actually at the very core of this often misunderstood profession. You may not be a talented or trained builder, yourself, but it doesn’t mean that you can’t help. One of the biggest challenges that the construction industry has to face, at the moment, is the lack of labor. People simply don’t want to work in this sector, as a result of unfair representation by the media. If you’re a communication wizard, you could help protect this essential industry by creating information blog articles for the general audience. On the one hand, you can help people to understand what working in buildings mean. On the other hand, you can create an attractive and engaging digital presence, guaranteed to appeal to future clients and workers.

Performing entrepreneurs need a human touch. Do you know what a bad boss looks like? Over half of employees have experienced a manager with poor leadership skills throughout their career. Bad bosses, unfortunately, are everywhere. Some choose to ignore the information to share with them, such as asking for your feedback on a project but ignoring anything that doesn’t suit them. In short, they don’t know how to listen and, more importantly, they are not aware of it. Other leaders tend to micromanage everything their employees do, which, ultimately is another way of saying they don’t trust you. Finally, there’s a type of leaders who simply don’t provide any feedback, positive or negative, leaving their employees to wonder whether they are doing a good job at all. In short, everyone can name a few examples of bad bosses. The main problem is that, more often than not, the bad boss doesn’t know he’s bad. This is where you come in. If you’ve got an eye for reading people’s behaviors and intentions, you can be a useful coach for new entrepreneurs. It can be difficult for someone who has never managed before to lead a team effectively. Using creative communication strategies and empathic understanding, you can help them to change their approach.

Students don’t know how to learn. If you’ve been working in a high-stress environment where your role was of an analytical nature, it’s fair to say that you know how to read a situation from the data available. You also know how to use creative thinking to find the best possible solution for the business. For anyone who has been a business consultant, a data analyst, a mathematician, a statistician, or even a business intelligence strategist, challenging the way people see the world is part of your everyday. That’s precisely this kind of skills you could share with students in your new career. Indeed, a lot of students lack critical thinking, and consequently, they find themselves unable to understand or question the material they study. As a result, most of the new graduates are unreflective thinkers who are unaware of the problems in their mental projections. They are not equipped to become the leaders of tomorrow. But by working with them, you can help them, as a tutor, to engage creatively with problems and provide insightful analysis.

Make reading more accessible. In America only, around 10 million children have difficulties learning to read. With the right support, they can overcome their difficulties. However, a staggering 10 percent of children become adults with reading impairment. This everyday disability can be a serious obstacle to their professional career and directly to their personal development. These people don’t only read less, but they fear books. However, if you have a way with words, you can join charity institutions and get in touch with specialist publishers to offer reader-accessible stories. Through the use of simplified sentences and easy vocabulary, you can help these people to overcome their fears and improve their abilities. You will find that writing for people with reader impairment can be rewarding in its own right, and it keeps your creative skills active.

Make the world an artistic place. Eventually, not everyone wants to use their creativity as a way to address a problem. If you want to be creative for the sake of creativity, you need to become a professional artist. Don’t shrug it off by claiming that the idea is preposterous. At the core of it, a professional artist is someone who sells the art they produce, whether it’s painting, singing, writing, or even acting. A visual artist has created a handy guide to help newcomers understand the different steps to succeed in this profession. Is the artist life an impossible dream? You’ll be surprised by the dynamism of this community. Visual creatives share their work on social media platforms, such as Instagram. Singers can use the iTunes market to share their creation. It’s a new world, but if you’re dedicated to it, there might be room for you too.

The bottom line is that there is more than one type of creation conversion. So, if you dream of bringing your ideas to life in a new career, it’s time to make it happen.

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Mia Guerra

Mia Guerra

Executive Editor at Chispa Magazine
Executive Editor at Chispa Magazine, Mia Guerra is a writer at heart. Regardless the topic, she loves to investigate, encourage, and ruminate on topics that can make us better people. Aiming to live a Proverbs 31 life, Mia is ecstatic to be following her calling with Chispa. At home she is her husband's sidekick and together they are raising a God-fearing family in Atlanta.

Mia Guerra

Executive Editor at Chispa Magazine, Mia Guerra is a writer at heart. Regardless the topic, she loves to investigate, encourage, and ruminate on topics that can make us better people. Aiming to live a Proverbs 31 life, Mia is ecstatic to be following her calling with Chispa. At home she is her husband's sidekick and together they are raising a God-fearing family in Atlanta.